THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY OF GAS VOUCHERS

Due to the current high gas prices, con artists have come out from beneath their rocks and have begun coming up with different schemes with the intention of convincing innocent consumers that they have a solution to the problems with the gas prices.

There are different schemes out there including those that claim to give consumers a chance to run their cars on the water along with other special "tech marvels" like magnets which are supposed to force more mileage out of the fuel you buy. You would be surprised by how many people fall for this hogwash and a lot of state offices have been forced to issue alerts and warnings concerning this scheme.

Are all gas voucher offerings scams? In truth, that depends. It is not very possible to confirm the authenticity of every claim, but below are some things which you can look out for and consider which can assist you in making an informed decision when you want to sign up for a plan.

THE GOOD

Some issuers of credit cards these days, encourage new customer sign ups by offering $25 or $50 gas vouchers just for making use of their cards even once. It can be a lovely offer, but that's just when you're not charged a fee which you have to pay off balances monthly. This type of credit card, as a 'rewards card' can provide added advantages which assist you with savings on different products and gasoline purchases. There are resorts that attract guests by giving out gas vouchers to soften the cost of getting there. As long as you don't pay a premium for other services, these offers can be truly beneficial.

THE BAD

There are car dealerships where gas vouchers are given out in an effort to attract new customers. When the vouchers are given along with the usual incentives as well, then there is absolutely no issue there. However, a lot of these "free gasoline for a year" offers usually reveal something you may not know at first; in accepting them, you forfeit other incentives that usually apply and at the end of the day, end up with something less advantageous than the initial, normal incentives.

THE UGLY

This one is a bit tricky as the scam being run here is of different types and forms. How it works is that you will be offered a $200 or more gas voucher, in exchange for a "processing fee" of $3.95 or more which is drafted from your checking. Usually, these schemes start with a phone call, and elderly people are the usual targets. Note that if you give out your checking account information, be very prepared to see it emptied of every penny.

When it comes to gas voucher offers, it sounds too fantastic to be real, then it most likely is fake. You can find other ways to save at the pump, but avoid getting taken by these false claims and schemes.